Happy Accident

sq

How could we have known
that time would slow and gasp for air –
we could steal a few moments extra
while her back was turned?

Who was there to warn us
that the space behind our eyes had room for rent –
we would move in uninvited,
never asking the other to leave?

Would we have known
the perfect place if we had found it –
when we already were living
in our favorite version of home?

Image Source

Bite-sized Wisdom: Keller

Doubt sneaking in? Remember that you have a powerful tool at hand that is ready to go into action for you at any time. Words from this wise and empowering woman:

imagine

Doubt and mistrust are the mere panic of timid imagination, which the steadfast heart will conquer, and the large mind transcend.

– Helen Keller


Image Source

You may also enjoy:

Crazy Ideas, Monumental Results: 6 Rules for Maintaining Creative Sanity

Wilhelm Reich, a student of Freud’s and radical pioneer of early psychoanalysis, kept diaries of his observations of the world – often fascinating, often misunderstood – yet still able to influence a number of notable intellectuals from Saul Bellow to William Burroughs. A culmination of his journal entries, letters and laboratory notebooks,  Where’s the Truth?: Letters and Journals, 1948-1957, follows three other autobiographical installments making this book the forth and final collection of his work.

In a particularly thoughtful entry dated June 7, 1948, Reich attempts to distill the six conditions necessary for creative sanity. In so doing he reveals his own doubts and aspirations while painting an ideal portrait of a life with true purpose.

tostay

sane1

sane2

sane3

sane4

sane5

sane6

The last principle is especially moving and an apt reminder that the promise of the “easy life” does not necessarily come from always treading the easiest path.

Old Lines Can Be Made New Again – The Missing Ingredient is You

trueplaces

gooduniversewise

mind

writedrunk

twinsouls

3oclock

light

prose

New York-based graphic designer Evan Robertson plucked out notable lines written by famous authors and transformed them into visual stories. Robertson would see a “little jewel of a sentence” and he’d underline it. Then, he would take those “snippets of text and ideas” and “let the words be a springboard for an illustration.”

Image Source: Obvious State

The NeverEnding Story

I’m out and about this week guys, exploring and wandering around strange and wild lands. Until I’m back and can tell you all about it, enjoy the petit posts.

Original Image found here