Some Years Ago — Never Mind How Long Precisely, Tilda Swinton Read a Tome

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How many of us can say that they’ve actually got around to reading Melville’s novel, easily considered a treasure of world literature?

Peninsula Arts with Plymouth University have made the daunting task a little easier with their 21st century-friendly project, the Big Read. Readers such as Tilda Swinton and Stephen Fry embellish a chapter of Moby Dick each with their voice and skill. The project also curated 136 artists to create an accompanying illustration for each of the chapters of the book.

No better way to revisit a classic than by bringing it to the arts-hungry culture in such a digestible format.

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Should you need me these next few days, I’ll be diving into these deeper waters.

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“America” Means Different Things to Different People

“I always liked the idea that America is a big facade. We are all insects crawling across on the shiny hood of a Cadillac. We’re all looking at the wrapping. But we won’t tear the wrapping to see what lies beneath.”
-Tom Waits

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Books Aren’t Just for Reading Anymore

Whether on a small or large scale, these clever projects will make you think twice about the power of a good book.

Artist: Johnathan Callan

Artist: Mike Stilkey

Artist: Brian Dettmer

Artist: Robert The

Artist: Guy Laramee

Artist: Jennifer Koshbin

Artist: Alex Queral

Artist: Su Blackwell

Artist: Alicia Martin

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

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10 Things You Should Start Doing Right Now

Take more photos.
There will be a time, ten years from now perhaps, when you get nostalgic and wonder why you did not capture every glorious moment that passed by when you were just a tad younger. This cycle will continue each decade or so. So start snapping and saving a few more of those small and candid moments – the ones that make your lips curl into that side smile that you love so well.
Care for something beside yourself. 
Whether it’s a garden, a pet, or child, or stranger, discover the joy of helping someone beside yourself.  As you come across challenges you will learn patience. When you finally see them succeed, you will realize why such cultivation is completely rewarding.
Wear whatever you want.
Create your own style. If you flaunt whatever you got on, most people won’t question it. So stop worrying about critical eyes. Focus instead on finding looks that are an extension of who you are.
Don’t allow routine to control your life.
Inject your days with things that surprise you and experiences you never thought you would have. If something sounds like it might be “out of character” for you, give it a try. (You may just discover that you’re actually awesome at fire juggling).
Travel without a destination.
Try the thrilling and nerve-racking experience of heading somewhere without a checklist in mind. Explore for exploration’s sake. Decide what you deem to be the most interesting parts of a city, not what another person dictates them to be.
Let your inner child out to play. 
Life’s too short to perpetually take yourself seriously. Allow yourself time to remember the joy that accompanies an unbridled mind, then let yours loose.
Read a book.
An actual book with pages, and cover, and all. Set aside the internet and get lost in someone else’s story for a while. Marvel at the strange permanence of the author’s words. Return to “real life” when you wish.

Dance on the edge of your fear.
Take a look at what frightens you. Now challenge yourself to lay down your best moves in spite of it all. This dance off will be your largest opportunity for growth, the thing that catapults you from the person you think you are to the person you’ve always wanted to be.

Celebrate.
Life will sling the bad and the ugly at you as well, but if you don’t take stock of the good, you may accidently forget how much of it comes your way.

Do your best to make love work.
Do not leave it all up to someone else read your mind or to fix everything. Chances are, you could be doing something too. Realize that great love transforms the things that you once thought impossible into possibilities. Isn’t that something worth fighting for?

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

Kreativ Blogger Award

You guys are the best. Thank you again!

Last week was full of little surprises – one of which was Pete Denton‘s nomination of Thoughts on Theatre for the Kreativ Blogger Award. Pete, thank you so much for your recognition. You should all take a moment to peak at his blog – he’s got some really good stuff over there.

In terms of recognizing other blogs and for a few fun facts, I’d like to direct you all to this post.

I’d also like to thank Elsie of Bowen Diaries as well as Jay of Positive Cookie Attitudes for their nods with a Versatile Blogger nomination.

Thank you Pete, Elsie, and Jay once again!

And thank you all for continuing to be wonderfully supportive readers.

Have a great start to your week!

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Genuine Blogger Award

Really? So grateful right now. Another huge thank you!

Coming back from a weekend full of birthday celebrations, football madness, and show-hopping, I was stunned to discover that the wonderfully creative blogger Flujan of My Voyage through Time nominated Thoughts On Theatre for the Genuine Blogger Award. Thank you so much for this nomination – I am honored to have your support. Again, I want to thank all of you who have taken the time to give your feedback and share this site with others these past few weeks. I’ve seen a number of new readers join us lately and I want to extend a warm welcome to you as well.

Apparently this lil’ guy is designed to have no rules at all – an award that allows you to celebrate as you see fit!

The original post on this describes the joy behind getting a nod of recognition and created this award because they “thought it would be nice to create an award that had no “rules” or “requirements.” It is just that…an award. An award given in the true “spirit” of giving some recognition for effort… It is an award that I hope allows recipients to know that their work is appreciated, valued, and noteworthy by a fellow blogger and it does not have the pressure of “rules and requirements” to follow.”

So as my way of celebrating, I would like to give a shout-out and thank you specifically to Anthony of Buy Art by Ant  and Mystic Vixen of Mystic Vixen for their kind words and recommendations of Thoughts on Theatre recently. Thank you for sharing with others. I hope to continue to see more of you in the future!

Flujan, thank you again!


Happy Monday everybody. If this adorable guy doesn’t get your morning started off right, I don’t know what will.

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Love Lessons from Stoppard

From “The Invention of Love,” a play in which Stoppard focuses on Latin-scholar Housman’s life and his relationships with his peers and professors (including Pater, Wilde, and Ruskin).

He postulates on the catalysts for this crazy little thing we call love:

“They loved, and quarreled, and made up, and loved, and fought, and were true to each other and untrue. She made him the happiest man in the whole world and the most wretched, and after a few years she died, and then, when he was thirty, he died, too. But by that time Catullus had invented the love poem.”

A great deal of the play concerns itself with the importance of education – even outside of the typical confines of the university. This passage is easily one of my favorites:

“The Renaissance teaches us that the book of knowledge is not to be learned by rote but is to be written anew in the ecstasy of living each moment for the moment’s sake. Success in life is to maintain this ecstasy, to burn always with this hard gem-like flame. Failure is to form habits. To burn with a gem-like flame is to capture the awareness of each moment; and for that moment only. To form habits is to be absent from those moments. How may we always be present for them?—to garner not the fruits of experience but experience itself?”

This play was another one of my gifts from the holiday season. While not as famous as some of his other works (Arcadia, The Coast of Utopia, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead), I’ve found it to be immersive and quite moving. If you’re in the mood for an intellectual and imaginative journey with Mr. Stoppard, this one is a good bet.