Before Photoshop, Folks Were Playing With Photos All the Same

‘Two-Headed Man’ (1855) by unidentified American artist

‘A Powerful Collision’, (1910s), Unknown Artist, German School

‘Man Juggling His Own Head’ (ca. 1880) by unidentified French artist

‘Room With Eye’ (1930) by Maurice Tabard (1897–1984)

‘The Vision (Orpheus Scene)’ (1907), F. Holland Day (American, Norwood, Massachusetts 1864–1933)

‘Dream No. 1- ‘Electrical Appliances for the Home” (1948) by Grete Stern (1904-1999)

‘Man on Rooftop with Eleven Men in Formation on His Shoulders’ (ca. 1930) by unidentified American artist

Images from  Metropolitan Museum of Art

As American as Apple Pie

Cars have seemingly always been a staple in good ol’ U.S. of A. – lynchpins of the American psyche and the ultimate symbols of  power, freedom and self-expression. And long before the dawn of the Mad Men era, woman were used as a way to sell them. Almost as common as the hood ornament adorning most of the classic models, the image of the female lounging on her car of choice is one that’s deeply entrenched in our culture. A woman sitting on, next-to, or even near a car became synonymous with sexuality, even when the photos were tame. The woman exercises her choice when she selects a car, just as she does when she picks out a man. Advertisers will market a car as “fast”, “exhilarating”, and “the ride of a lifetime,” and our minds need only hop a short distance to see that this language could apply to either a mate or a horsepower vehicle of choice.

Image Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10